comicsalliance:

GIRL FIGHT: THE MARVEL/DC RIVALRY FINALLY EXTENDS TO WINNING THE FEMALE AUDIENCE
By Andrew Wheeler
Marvel launches the eighth of its nine solo titles with a female lead in November with Spider-Woman #1, and the book sadly already has a cloud over it. A variant cover by master erotic artist Milo Manara stirred enough controversy last week to garner mainstream attention. The cover featured Spider-Woman with her apple-shaped butt raised high in decidedly unheroic manner. It was exactly what one would expect from Manara, who’s created a number of superheroine illustrations for Marvel, but the image suggested a particularly overt tone of sexual objectification that could alienate the sort of readers who attended the Women In Marvel panel at San Diego where the series was announced.
As far as I can recall, Marvel has more female solo titles now than ever before, with a ninth title, Angela: Asgard’s Assassin, launching in December. On paper, that suggests a laudable effort to reach out to superhero comics’ growing and under-served audience of female readers. Yet the Manara incident serves to remind us that books about women can very easily be targeted to a male audience.
There’s currently an unspoken contest between Marvel and DC to see who can produce more comics aimed at a female audience. It’s possible the contest only exists in my head, as I’ve been keeping a tally of solo titles with female leads for the past several months — but I wouldn’t be surprised to learn that editors at the two publishers have also been keeping track.
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comicsalliance:

GIRL FIGHT: THE MARVEL/DC RIVALRY FINALLY EXTENDS TO WINNING THE FEMALE AUDIENCE

By Andrew Wheeler

Marvel launches the eighth of its nine solo titles with a female lead in November with Spider-Woman #1, and the book sadly already has a cloud over it. A variant cover by master erotic artist Milo Manara stirred enough controversy last week to garner mainstream attention. The cover featured Spider-Woman with her apple-shaped butt raised high in decidedly unheroic manner. It was exactly what one would expect from Manara, who’s created a number of superheroine illustrations for Marvel, but the image suggested a particularly overt tone of sexual objectification that could alienate the sort of readers who attended the Women In Marvel panel at San Diego where the series was announced.

As far as I can recall, Marvel has more female solo titles now than ever before, with a ninth title, Angela: Asgard’s Assassin, launching in December. On paper, that suggests a laudable effort to reach out to superhero comics’ growing and under-served audience of female readers. Yet the Manara incident serves to remind us that books about women can very easily be targeted to a male audience.

There’s currently an unspoken contest between Marvel and DC to see who can produce more comics aimed at a female audience. It’s possible the contest only exists in my head, as I’ve been keeping a tally of solo titles with female leads for the past several months — but I wouldn’t be surprised to learn that editors at the two publishers have also been keeping track.

READ MORE

(via trials-of-socrates)

Every time I are this thing I want to go swimming. Which is basically all the time because it’s right in the middle of campus. It’s just so bluuuuuuue

Oh and you know how there is always that one group in lab that inexplicably finishes before everyone else? Yeah, I think I somehow made it into that group thus semester. Oh yeah, short labs!

Every time I are this thing I want to go swimming. Which is basically all the time because it’s right in the middle of campus. It’s just so bluuuuuuue

Oh and you know how there is always that one group in lab that inexplicably finishes before everyone else? Yeah, I think I somehow made it into that group thus semester. Oh yeah, short labs!